Axe Handle

Axe Handle

Humans have been using handheld, rudimentary stone implements for some 2.5 million years, but it wasn’t until around 11,000 years ago that humans began to develop their tool production skills. Instead of simple, cone shaped chipped stones, tools became highly polished axe shaped implements, ideal for a hunter-gatherer life style. This was the beginning of the Stone Age, the period in human history that marks the advent of tool production. The name comes from the fact that most of the period’s cutting tools are made from stone.

Secret Dove tails

Secret Dove tails

  in a previous article I covered Through and half-blins dovetails   In previous articles, I have shown you how to make through and half-blind dovetails. This week I look at secret dovetails or mitred dovetails. Whenever I make boxes, and I make a...
Making a Knuckle Joint

Making a Knuckle Joint

Recently I restored a beautiful drop leaf cherry table.

Most of it was intact and needed only a little restoration, but one element that really needed some help was the wooden hinge joint that had broken over its many years of use. The knuckle hinge allows the support legs to swing out so the loose leaf can then rest on top.

The knuckle joint in Fig. 1 is quite unique, in this article I will take you through the steps to make a more traditional hinge joint.

Puzzle Table

Puzzle Table

Several weeks ago, a friend of mine – knowing my obsession with all things wood – said “I have a puzzle table I think you’d like”. As a child growing up we were constantly doing jigsaw puzzles and it generally involved taking over the kitchen table for several days and having to eat in the living room.

From Bed to Bench

From Bed to Bench

There is one constant in my woodworking life and it’s not the wood or the tools, it’s my wife, Lisa.  After a long morning in the woodshop, she’ll be at the door saying, “Thought you might like a cuppa,” with a plate of digestives in hand and, “Let’s go sit for a while on the bench,” No, not the woodworking bench (although I have done that many a time)…

And so we walk into what has lovingly become known as the ‘English garden’, a small corner in our ‘yard’ that features a hedgerow and other traditionally English plants. Nestled in amongst the growth is our garden bench. And what is a garden without a bench?!

In this article I’ll be showing you how to turn the wooden head and foot boards of an old double bed frame into a charming garden bench.

Read the full Article here