Rustic Votive Holders

Rustic Votive Holders

Candles have been around for centuries – the earliest known candles were first seen in China around 200 BC and appeared in Europe after 400 AD. These first candles were generally made of natural fat and wax, with paraffin revolutionising candle-making in the 1830s.

From Bed to Bench

From Bed to Bench

There is one constant in my woodworking life and it’s not the wood or the tools, it’s my wife, Lisa.  After a long morning in the woodshop, she’ll be at the door saying, “Thought you might like a cuppa,” with a plate of digestives in hand and, “Let’s go sit for a while on the bench,” No, not the woodworking bench (although I have done that many a time)…

And so we walk into what has lovingly become known as the ‘English garden’, a small corner in our ‘yard’ that features a hedgerow and other traditionally English plants. Nestled in amongst the growth is our garden bench. And what is a garden without a bench?!

In this article I’ll be showing you how to turn the wooden head and foot boards of an old double bed frame into a charming garden bench.

Read the full Article here

Wooden Finger Rings

Wooden Finger Rings

“I want to make a wooden ring for my sister,” were the words of my young ‘Padawan’ Wes, “It’s simple!” he said as he proceeded to explain how we could do it on the lathe. I pointed out that while my turning skills are pretty good when it comes to big stuff like table legs, candle sticks and bowls. Tiny finger rings was a whole different story…

Cope and Stick Sled

Cope and Stick Sled

The term cope is probably familiar to you, it’s the term given when cutting crown moulding or skirting board profiles so that one piece perfectly matches the profile of the other intersecting piece. Typically this profile is cut with a coping saw.

Cope and stick construction is a technique used in making panel doors and window frames. Rails and stiles are given a decorative profile, using paired router bits.

Wormy Side Table

Wormy Side Table

As a woodworker and avid ‘upcycler’, I am always loathed to see wood go to waste. So, when a friend said they had some wormy maple they couldn’t use I knew I just had to have it. Instantly I knew I wanted to make something with it that would show off the worm holes to create a beautifully organic effect in the piece.

There’s no bad wood…

There’s no bad wood…

Hank Gilpin has been designing and building fine art furniture for almost 30 years. A native of Connecticut, Gilpin graduated from Boston University with a degree in photojournalism. He served in Vietnam as an army photographer, and returned to the States with the intention to study photography at the Rhode Island School of Design. A random choice of electives led Gilpin to woodworking, and his first teacher (and future mentor) was Tage Frid.