Dear reader, 

Hope your Summer has got off to a wonderful start?! 

The latest woodworking article is available in this newsletter.

The potting shed article will be in the next newsletter 

Thanks for your continued interest.

Michael

Mystery Tool - 2 revealed

This was the mystery tool - I had many responses but not a s …

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June's Mystery Tool

This month's Mystery tool. If you think you know - drop me a …

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Replacing a Kitchen Counter

Replacing a Kitchen Counter

I had just finished a kitchen cabinet for a colleague and I …

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IMG_2578

Mystery item - 1 revealed

Some weeks ago I posted this unusual item as a mystery tool …

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Part 2 - A Beginners Guide to Using Hand Tools and Traditional methods

Part 2 - A Beginners Guide to Using Hand Tools and Traditional methods

Part 1 is available here

Make a tabletop

The second of several articles on using hand tools.

This article first appeared in The GMC Group's Publication Woodwork Craft Issue 2 July 2015
In last month’s article, we looked at making the base of a small table, attaching the legs to the skirt using mortise and tenon joints – one of the basic joints of a joiner – and securing the joint with the ancient technique of drawboring. In this article, we will finish the table by adding a handfinished top.

As I mentioned last time, your tool collection will grow as your experience and needs increase. Well, we have already reached the point where to continue with this project, we need to add a few more ‘necessary tools’, namely a ripsaw, a couple of 610mm bar clamps, a hand drill, a set of brad point bits, a countersink, a flat head screwdriver and a marking gauge.

Wood selection
To make a tabletop, we need the widest and most stable boards we can find. The most stable wood is quartersawn, where the wood is sawn radially out from the centre of the log, with annular rings running perpendicular to the board’s face.

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